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Does Generalized Joint Laxity Affect Postoperative Alignment and Clinical Outcomes Following Medial Opening-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy?

  • Man Soo Kim
    Affiliations
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Jae Jung Kim
    Affiliations
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Ki Ho Kang
    Affiliations
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Kyung Jun Sin
    Affiliations
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Yong In
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Yong In, MD, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-Daero, Seocho-Gu, Seoul, 06591, Republic of Korea.
    Affiliations
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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Published:October 26, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2022.10.033

      Abstract

      Background

      The purpose of this study was to investigate whether generalized joint laxity affects the postoperative alignment and clinical outcomes of medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO).

      Methods

      A total of 198 patients who underwent MOWHTO was divided into two groups according to absence or presence of generalized joint laxity. Generalized joint laxity was measured using the Beighton and Horan criteria, and a score of 4 or more out of 9 was defined as generalized joint laxity. A weight bearing line (WBL) ratio of 55% to 70% was considered an acceptable postoperative lower limb alignment range; WBL over 70% was defined as overcorrection and less than 55% as undercorrection. The WBL ratio was investigated before and 2 years after surgery, and the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index scale score (WOMAC) was evaluated for patient-reported outcomes (PRO) of MOWHTO. There were 147 (73.7%) patients in the nongeneralized joint laxity group and 51 (26.3%) in the generalized joint laxity group. Preoperatively, there was no difference between the two groups in hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle or WBL ratio (all P > .05).

      Results

      At 2 years postoperatively, the generalized joint laxity group showed significantly higher HKA angle and WBL ratio than the nongeneralized joint laxity group (all P < .05). There was a significant difference in the distribution ratio of undercorrection, normocorrection, and overcorrection patients between the two groups (P < .05). There were no differences between the two groups in preoperative and postoperative WOMAC scores (all, P > .05).

      Conclusion

      The generalized joint laxity significantly affected postoperative over correction of alignment following MOWHTO. However, there was no significant difference in PRO between the patients who did and did not have generalized joint laxity after MOWHTO until 2 years.

      Keywords

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